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Criminal Alien of the Week Report 01-30-20 by David Cross

MGN

It has been an interesting last week in the month of January when it comes to criminal aliens (illegal aliens) here in the Pacific Northwest states of Oregon, Washington and Idaho.

This week we take a look at for your Pacific Northwest radio listeners an illegal alien previously removed from United States who was recently involved in a Hit and Run accident that allegedly caused the death of a woman in Multnomah County, Oregon.

But first some background information; last year I requested from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Public Affairs immigration enforcement stories.

Monday, January 27, 2020 ICE Public Affairs Officer (PAO) Tanya J. Roman sent via e-mail the following statement on Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, aka Manuel Garcia-Ledesma, age 42, a crime story with illegal immigration enforcement implications:

“Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, aka Manuel Garcia-Ledesma, is a citizen of Mexico and is in the United States illegally. On June 5, 2019, Mendoza-Chavez was arrested by the Portland Police Bureau in Portland, Oregon for felony criminally negligent homicide and failure to perform duties of a driver to injured persons and was booked into the Multnomah County Jail. On June 7, U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers lodged an immigration detainer on Mendoza-Chavez with the Multnomah County Jail. On that same day, Mendoza-Chavez posted bail and Multnomah County Jail released him back into the community. No notification was given to ICE of Mendoza-Chavez’s release.

On July 12, 2019, Officers with ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO), located and arrested Mendoza-Chavez and he was subsequently transferred to the Northwest ICE Processing Center in Tacoma, Washington. On Jan. 6, 2020, Mendoza-Chavez was ordered removed from the United States to Mexico by a federal immigration judge with the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) which is under the Department of Justice (DOJ).

Mendoza-Chavez’s is an illegally present Mexican national who was previously arrested in Phoenix, Arizona on April 19, 1999, by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). At the time of this encounter, Mendoza-Chavez was granted a voluntary return and was allowed to voluntarily return to his native Mexico. Mendoza-Chavez later illegally entered the U.S. from Mexico at an unknown time and location. He is currently pending further immigration proceedings.

Due to sanctuary policies that shield criminal aliens and endanger public safety, local law enforcement requesting to have an ICE detainee returned to local custody to face criminal charges, must provide ICE with an arrest warrant in addition to a judicial transport warrant, from the requesting court, requiring the ICE detainee be returned exclusively to ICE custody at the conclusion of the criminal court proceedings. The arrest warrant and judicial transport order ensures all ICE detainees will not be released back into the community where they can reoffend and/or released by non-cooperative jurisdictions that do not honor ICE detainers. As of Jan. 27, 2020, Multnomah County has not provided any such documents to ICE.” – Tanya J. Roman, ICE Public Affairs Officer.

“On Background:

▪ Federal prisoners in ICE custody may lawfully be transferred to the custody of a state or local government pursuant to a state writ of habeas. Writ’s, also referred to as transport warrants, are an agreement that if ICE transfers custody of a criminal alien to a local jurisdiction for prosecution, that the alien will be returned to ICE prior to the individuals release.

▪ ICE officers carry out targeted enforcement actions every day in locations around the country as part of the agency’s ongoing efforts to protect the nation, uphold public safety, and protect the integrity of our immigration laws and border controls.

▪ When law enforcement agencies don’t honor ICE detainers, these individuals, who often have significant criminal histories, are released onto the street, presenting an avoidable public safety threat. Further, when ICE officers have to go out into the community to proactively locate these criminal aliens, it creates added risks to our personnel and to public safety. Additionally, once these criminals are out on the street, confirming their whereabouts is often time consuming and resource intensive. Many of our arrest targets are seasoned criminals who are savvy about eluding law enforcement.

▪ Any jurisdiction thinking that refusing to cooperate with ICE will result in a decrease in immigration enforcement is mistaken. Jurisdictions that choose to not cooperate with ICE are likely to see an increase in ICE field enforcement activity, as ICE has no choice but to conduct more at-large arrest operations. A consequence of ICE conducting more street arrests is the agency is likely to encounter additional unlawfully present foreign nationals that would otherwise not have been encountered had ICE been afforded the opportunity to take custody of a criminal target within the confines of a local jail.

▪ Despite the significant obstacles local sanctuary policies have created for ICE, we remain committed to our public safety mission and we will continue to fulfill ICE’s lawful mandate and sworn duty to identify, locate and arrest dangerous criminal aliens and other immigration violators. ICE seeks straightforward cooperation with all local law enforcement and elected officials.” – ICE Public Affairs.

Some recent criminal back ground history on Jaime Mendoza-Chavez (ID: 817510; DOB: unknown):

At the time of Jaime Mendoza-Chavez’s initial arrest and incarceration on June 5, 2019 at the Multnomah County Jail in Portland, Oregon Mendoza-Chavez was charged with one count of Negligent Homicide (A Class B Felony) and Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver Injury (A Class C Felony). His combined bail on the two felonies was $25,000.00.

A June 6, 2019 Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office (MCDAO) news release titled “Charges filed against 42-year-old man in connection with April 2019 vehicular homicide investigation” revealed that on April 10, 2019 Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, the resulting consequences of Hit and Run accident, was charged in the killing 82 year-old Sandra Bosch.

The MCDAO June 6th news release also revealed Jaime Mendoza-Chavez admitted to consumption of alcohol prior to the accident that killed Sandra Bosch.

Analysis of the preceding ICE Pubic Affairs’ statement on Jaime Mendoza-Chavez:

April 19, 1999 the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) arrested Mexican national Jaime Mendoza-Chavez in Phoenix, Arizona for being illegally present in the United States.

After the INS arrested illegal alien Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, he was granted a voluntary return to Mexico.

ICE doesn’t know the time and location after Jaime Mendoza-Chavez was granted a voluntary return to Mexico he illegally reentered the U.S. from Mexico.

On June 7, 2019 ICE Officers’ lodged an immigration detainer on Jaime Mendoza-Chavez with the Multnomah County Jail.

June 7th, the same day, Jaime Mendoza-Chavez posted bail and Multnomah County Jail Deputies’ released Mendoza-Chavez back into the community, ignoring the immigration detainer, failing to contact ICE Officers on him being released from the jail.

On July 12, 2019 ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) located and arrested Jaime Mendoza-Chavez and he was then transferred to the Northwest ICE Processing Center in Tacoma, Washington.

January 6, 2020, a federal immigration judge with the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which is under the Department of Justice (DOJ), ordered Jaime Mendoza-Chavez’s removal from the United States to Mexico.

According to the ICE Pubic Affairs’ statement on Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, he faces current further pending immigration proceedings.

The ICE Pubic Affairs’ statement offers a form of legal olive branch to Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, indirectly to the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office, in explaining there is set legal process ICE has in dealing with a county with sanctuary policies if legal authorities want to have an ICE detainee returned to local custody to face criminal charges.

Law enforcement “must provide ICE with an arrest warrant in addition to a judicial transport warrant, from the requesting court, requiring the ICE detainee be returned exclusively to ICE custody at the conclusion of the criminal court proceedings.”

As of Monday, January 27, 2020 Multnomah County legal authorities have not provided ICE with an arrest warrant and judicial transport order so Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, the alleged killer of Sandra Bosch, can be returned to Oregon to have the criminal charges against him adjudicated before he is deported Mexico.

Media Inquiries

Office of Public Affairs

01/27/2020

ICE Statement: Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, aka Manuel Garcia-Ledesma

“Jaime Mendoza-Chavez, aka Manuel Garcia-Ledesma, is a citizen of Mexico and is in the United States illegally. On June 5, 2019, Mendoza-Chavez was arrested by the Portland Police Bureau in Portland, Oregon for felony criminally negligent homicide and failure to perform duties of a driver to injured persons and was booked into the Multnomah County Jail. On June 7, U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers lodged an immigration detainer on Mendoza-Chavez with the Multnomah County Jail. On that same day, Mendoza-Chavez posted bail and Multnomah County Jail released him back into the community. No notification was given to ICE of Mendoza-Chavez’s release.

On July 12, 2019, Officers with ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO), located and arrested Mendoza-Chavez and he was subsequently transferred to the Northwest ICE Processing Center in Tacoma, Washington. On Jan. 6, 2020, Mendoza-Chavez was ordered removed from the United States to Mexico by a federal immigration judge with the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) which is under the Department of Justice (DOJ).

Mendoza-Chavez’s is an illegally present Mexican national who was previously arrested in Phoenix, Arizona on April 19, 1999, by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). At the time of this encounter, Mendoza-Chavez was granted a voluntary return and was allowed to voluntarily return to his native Mexico. Mendoza-Chavez later illegally entered the U.S. from Mexico at an unknown time and location. He is currently pending further immigration proceedings.

Due to sanctuary policies that shield criminal aliens and endanger public safety, local law enforcement requesting to have an ICE detainee returned to local custody to face criminal charges, must provide ICE with an arrest warrant in addition to a judicial transport warrant, from the requesting court, requiring the ICE detainee be returned exclusively to ICE custody at the conclusion of the criminal court proceedings. The arrest warrant and judicial transport order ensures all ICE detainees will not be released back into the community where they can reoffend and/or released by non-cooperative jurisdictions that do not honor ICE detainers. As of Jan. 27, 2020, Multnomah County has not provided any such documents to ICE.” – Tanya J. Roman, ICE Public Affairs Officer.

On Background:

▪ Federal prisoners in ICE custody may lawfully be transferred to the custody of a state or local government pursuant to a state writ of habeas. Writ’s, also referred to as transport warrants, are an agreement that if ICE transfers custody of a criminal alien to a local jurisdiction for prosecution, that the alien will be returned to ICE prior to the individuals release.

▪ ICE officers carry out targeted enforcement actions every day in locations around the country as part of the agency’s ongoing efforts to protect the nation, uphold public safety, and protect the integrity of our immigration laws and border controls.

▪ When law enforcement agencies don’t honor ICE detainers, these individuals, who often have significant criminal histories, are released onto the street, presenting an avoidable public safety threat. Further, when ICE officers have to go out into the community to proactively locate these criminal aliens, it creates added risks to our personnel and to public safety. Additionally, once these criminals are out on the street, confirming their whereabouts is often time consuming and resource intensive. Many of our arrest targets are seasoned criminals who are savvy about eluding law enforcement.

▪ Any jurisdiction thinking that refusing to cooperate with ICE will result in a decrease in immigration enforcement is mistaken. Jurisdictions that choose to not cooperate with ICE are likely to see an increase in ICE field enforcement activity, as ICE has no choice but to conduct more at-large arrest operations. A consequence of ICE conducting more street arrests is the agency is likely to encounter additional unlawfully present foreign nationals that would otherwise not have been encountered had ICE been afforded the opportunity to take custody of a criminal target within the confines of a local jail.

▪ Despite the significant obstacles local sanctuary policies have created for ICE, we remain committed to our public safety mission and we will continue to fulfill ICE’s lawful mandate and sworn duty to identify, locate and arrest dangerous criminal aliens and other immigration violators. ICE seeks straightforward cooperation with all local law enforcement and elected officials. – ICE Public Affairs.

Multnomah Co. District Attorney’s Office

Charges filed against 42-year-old man in connection with April 2019 vehicular homicide investigation – 06/06/19

June 6, 2019

Charges filed against 42-year-old man in connection with April 2019 vehicular homicide investigation

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that criminal charges were filed against 42-year-old Jaime Mendoza-Chavez in connection to a vehicular homicide investigation.

According to court documents, on April 10, 2019, members of the Portland Police Bureau, including the Traffic Division’s Major Crash Team, responded to the intersection of North Fessenden Street and North Polk Avenue on reports of a vehicle versus pedestrian hit and run crash.

Law enforcement and paramedics responded and located 82-year-old Ms. Sandra Bosch unresponsive in the roadway. She died on scene.

A witness told law enforcement that he was driving westbound on North Fessenden Street when he saw Ms. Bosch crossing the street, according to court documents. The witness slowed his vehicle and stopped as Ms. Bosch crossed the street.

The same witness reported observing a vehicle coming eastbound on North Fessenden traveling at about 45 miles per hour, according to court documents. The witness said the vehicle then struck Ms. Bosch and that the driver never attempted to stop.

Another witness, according to court documents, also witnessed the crash and reported that Ms. Bosch struck her head on the windshield on the passenger side.

On April 11, 2019, the University of Portland’s Department of Public Safety contacted the Bureau of Emergency Communications to report a suspicious vehicle that was parked at North McKenna Avenue and North Warren Street. The vehicle had a smashed front windshield with what appeared to be hair embedded in the glass, according to court documents.

The vehicle was located approximately two miles from where Ms. Bosch was hit and killed.

On May 21, 2019, the Oregon State Police Crime Lab confirmed the evidence recovered from the vehicle matched Ms. Bosch’s DNA, according to court documents.

Law enforcement made efforts to contact the vehicle’s owner. Earlier this week, law enforcement contacted Mendoza-Chavez who told police he “wanted to tell the truth,” according to court documents.

According to court documents, Mendoza-Chavez admitted he was the driver of the vehicle that hit and killed Ms. Bosch and that he had consumed two beers.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Mendoza-Chavez is innocent unless and until proven guilty.


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